WOUNDED KNEE MASSACRE: “CAN’T KILL OUR SPIRIT – WE ARE STILL HERE !”

The Wounded Knee Massacre occurred on December 29, 1890, near Wounded Knee Creek on the Lakota Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in the U.S. state of South Dakota. For the past 25 years, Native American people have been riding, running and walking the route that Chief Bigfoot followed with his people, before they were massacred at the site of Wounded Knee.

Hundreds Ride to Wounded Knee for 125th Anniversary of 1890 Massacre

On December 29, 1890, the U.S. Army killed as many as 300 Oglala Lakota Indians, including many women and children. The commemorative Chief Big Foot Band Memorial Ride began more than a week ago when riders set out from Bridger, South Dakota. They traveled more than 150 miles on horseback until reaching Wounded Knee. The site is remembered not only for the 1890 massacre, but also for the historic 1973 occupation, in which members of the American Indian Movement occupied Wounded Knee to demand their treaty rights.

 

Mass grave for the dead Lakota after the conflict at Wounded Knee Creek

Mass grave for the dead Lakota after the conflict at Wounded Knee Creek

Russell Means: “The United States government and its people have effectively isolated Indian people and filed away our treaties for over a century and more. Consequently, the United States government neither has—they haven’t any explanation if they massacre us, based on the treaty rights, and they haven’t any answers for us if they negotiated over our treaty rights. Right now, I imagine that in Washington, D.C., there’s a heck of a lot of bureaucrats and White House personnel researching Indian treaties. Now, until those treaty questions are resolved, you’re going to have much more, many more Wounded Knees.”

 

The Ban on Dancing

Rosebud and Sioux Indian, War Dance at Pine Ridge 1890 : Native American Lakota Sioux men and boys perform a dance on the Pine Ridge Agency, South Dakota.

Rosebud and Sioux Indian, War Dance at Pine Ridge 1890 : Native American Lakota Sioux men and boys perform a dance on the Pine Ridge Agency, South Dakota.

Dance, a significant aspect of Native cultural expression, has always played a vital role in both utilitarian and religious ritual and ceremony. In the push west in the years after the Civil War, however, Americans viewed Indian dancing as a threat. Fearing an orchestrated Indian uprising, by the 1870s, both the U.S. and Canada had enacted laws banning the performance of cultural or religious rituals, including dancing. Some 19 years later, General Nelson Miles, assigned to investigate the Ghost Dance phenomenon among the Plains tribes, issued a warning that if the practice was not stopped, it could lead to an all-out Indian war. In response, the War Department deployed 7,000 troops to maintain control over the Lakota.

Read more at http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2016/01/01/truth-about-wounded-knee-massacre-162923

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